Wight Woodturners

 

Mark Hancock Demo

Saturday 11th March 2017

 

 

Our demonstrator for the day was Mark Hancock from Pershore. He started turning in 1989 and moved to his current studio in 2005. Mark explained that he worked mainly with green wood from Worcester woodlands. This was cheap and relatively easy to turn. At present he is developing his drop series inspired by a drop of falling water. Unfortunately these are gallery pieces and take too long to make to be able to demonstrate but Mark had two interesting pieces to show us.

 

Three legged vessel:

Mark was using a 13 month old piece of Oak he considered slightly past its best. He would mount this between centres with grain parallel to the lathe and demonstrate hollowing, carving the legs whilst carrying the profile through to the bottom of the vessel and carbon ebonising at high temperature.

 

 

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The Oak blank

Find the centre and with the blank on a firm surface hit the drive sharply with a mallet.

Tip: The drive prongs should not be in line with the grain.

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Mounting between centres.

Tip: use blue tack to attach a plumbing olive to the tail centre to give a ring centre.

Using the spindle roughing gouge.

Caution: the spindle roughing gouge should not be used on cross grain wood because it is a reduced tang tool and exceptionally has been known to break.

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Shaping the legs

And in the opposite direction.

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Remounted on a spigot in the O’Donnell jaws and cleaning up the face.

Tip: tighten the jaws in each position to take up the slack on each pinion

Refinement of the sides.

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‘Drilling’ the centre for depth. Drop the speed.

Mark shows the German spoon shaped tool that he uses for drilling rather than a spindle gouge.

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A close up of the spoon shaped bit.

The Veritas thickness calipers in use.

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16.5 inch Veritas calipers

Using a shielded carbide cutter [Rolly Munroe]

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Mark uses a cabinet scraper for final finish at an angle of about 45 degrees trailing. Burr side or not.

The profile of the outside will be carried through to the underside of the vessel.

Tip: Stop the lathe and sand with the grain to wipe out a trouble area or pimple in the middle.

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Hollowing the legs with initial support from the tail centre.

Tip: keep checking/tightening with wet wood

Nearly done.

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Marking up the legs.

Starting to shape the legs. A profile gauge is used to check the curve.

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Mark was banished to the car park to ebonise the Oak. He is using a Mapp pro gas torch which heats to over 2000 degrees C. Spray with water to kill the embers.

Back inside. Burnish to remove carbon.

Caution: do not use a dust extractor because of fire risk.

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The jaws are changed in sequence to get a throw. 1,3,4,2

The ebonised bowl re-mounted and taped up

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Slightly offset turning

Wash with acrylic paint and wipe off.

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The red band on the offset cut can be seen in this shot

Mark described the gilding process which can be used on the inside of the vessel.

 

Crooked Goblet:

 

Mark’s second project was a Crooked Goblet in Ash. He demonstrated turning a small goblet with long stem and captive ring. He then reduced the stem and bent it on a bending iron.

  

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Examples of the crooked goblet

Mount the blank avoiding the pith centre.

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Take down to a cylinder

Turn a spigot on one end

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General shot of the demo

Put in the chuck, no tailstock support.

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Using a 10mm spindle gouge with a fingernail grind to hollow out the cup…

… and shape the outside

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Working down the stem

Working on the captive ring

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Finishing off the captive ring….

..and there it is

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Finished ‘straight’ goblet

Close up of grind on captive ring tool made from an old forged nail.

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Lay the goblet on its side with the grain horizontal and reduce the top and bottom with a cabinet scraper

Modified stem, now a ribbon

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Bending the stem round the bending iron

Mark declined to do an Isle of Wight shape but produced pronounced curves on the stem

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The finished ‘Crooked Goblet’. A mirror or coin can be put in the base to act as a counter-weight.

The bending iron

 

 

We thank Mark for his interesting demo with lots of tips and a few words of caution.

 

 

More of Mark’s work can be seen on his website at Click here to view Mark Hancock's Home Page

Mark can also be seen working on a rocking vessel Click here to view

 

Our next demonstration will be by Colwin Way on Saturday 14th October

 

 

David Burden

 

September 2017